Lead Researchers

Ann Hill Duin, Ph.D., is a Professor of Scientific and Technical Communication at the University of Minnesota, where she is Director of Graduate Studies. Having pioneered the University’s first online course at the graduate level, she continues to study the impact of emerging technologies––including networked learning and wearables––on the future of teaching/learning and higher education.

Joseph Moses, Ph.D., is a Senior Lecturer of writing studies at the University of Minnesota where he is developing an agile writing framework for instructional design in technical communication.

Megan McGrath is a Ph.D. candidate in the Writing Studies Department at the University of Minnesota––Twin Cities, where she teaches first-year writing and technical and professional writing. Her research examines how emerging technologies, such as wearables, influence agency, identity, and social norms. In the process, Megan's work also focuses on helping students cultivate digital literacies in ways that draw attention to the power structures enabling and constraining––and enabled and constrained by––technology use today.

Jason Tham is a Ph.D. candidate in the University of Minnesota’s Rhetoric and Scientific and Technical Communication program. He studies how emerging technologies invite different ways of thinking and learning, and the increasingly intense flow of information occurring between people and machines. His dissertation project is a study of multimodal composing in makerspaces.

Nathan Bollig is a Ph.D. student in the Rhetoric and Scientific and Technical Communication program at the University of Minnesota--Twin Cities. His current research focuses on the impacts of technology on writing pedagogy. Specifically, Nathan’s projects involves writing curriculum development and student outcomes in First-Year and Advanced Writing contexts.

Jeremy Rosselot-Merritt is a Ph.D. student in the Rhetoric and Scientific and Technical Communication program at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. His research deals with technical communication pedagogy, collaborative workplace writing, usability, and open source technologies. He is also interested in the ways in which wearable medical technologies impact agency as well as the rhetorical nature of communications that emerge about those technologies. 

Chakrika Veeramoothoo is a Ph.D. student in the Rhetoric and Scientific and Technical Communication program at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. Her research interests include the rhetoric of protest movements, technical communication and composition pedagogy and the use of wearables in workplaces.

WRC at a Glance

Established: 2016

Department Home: Writing Studies

Current Active Collaborators: Seven