Collab Members

Nathan Bollig is a Ph.D. candidate in the Rhetoric and Scientific and Technical Communication program at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. His current research focuses on the impacts of technology on writing pedagogy. Specifically, Nathan’s projects involves writing curriculum development and student outcomes in First-Year and Advanced Writing contexts.

Katlynne Davis is a PhD student in the Rhetoric and Scientific and Technical Communication program at UMN. She studies how corporations communicate with their audiences on social media. She is also interested in how various technologies, including social media, can act as spaces for multimodal composing in the classroom. Her current research includes examining what listening means to professional social media writers and how listening is a part of social media communication strategy.

Ann Hill Duin, Ph.D., is a Professor of Scientific and Technical Communication at the University of Minnesota, where she is Director of Graduate Studies. Having pioneered the University’s first online course at the graduate level, she continues to study the impact of emerging technologies—including networked learning and wearables—on the future of teaching/learning and higher education.

Ellen Dupler is a Master's student in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department and a graduate researcher in the College of Design's Wearable Technology Lab. Her research interests span from smart textile and embodied technology development to human-technology digital interfaces, as well as their implications for user experience and communication. 

Joseph Moses, Ph.D., is a Senior Lecturer of writing studies at the University of Minnesota. His current research focuses on measuring the effectiveness of instructional designs for writing-to-learn in teams. 

Jeremy Rosselot-Merritt is a Ph.D. student in the Rhetoric and Scientific and Technical Communication program at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. His research deals with technical communication pedagogy, collaborative workplace writing, usability, and open source technologies. He is also interested in the ways in which wearable medical technologies impact agency as well as the rhetorical nature of communications that emerge about those technologies.

Danielle Stambler is a Ph.D. student in the Rhetoric and Scientific and Technical Communication program at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. Her research interests include digital rhetoric, visual rhetoric, rhetoric of health and medicine, new media and game studies, usability and user experience, and multimodality and composition pedagogy. In particular, she is interested in visual rhetoric, data visualization, and gamification in health and medical apps, websites and portals.

Jason Tham is a Ph.D. candidate in the University of Minnesota’s Rhetoric and Scientific and Technical Communication program. He studies how emerging technologies invite different ways of thinking and learning, and the increasingly intense flow of information occurring between people and machines. His dissertation project is a study of multimodal composing in makerspaces.

Chakrika Veeramoothoo is a PhD student in the Rhetoric and Scientific and Technical Communication program at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. Her research interests include collaboration and technology use in intercultural communication, international communication and collaboration. She is also interested in studying intercultural communication in various settings, including organizations working with refugees.

Ryan Wold is an MA student in Rhetoric and Scientific & Technical Communication program at the University of Minnesota. His research focuses on the way technology is changing the way we understand audience. Ryan's current projects explore how the intersection of persuasive technology and the attention economy is changing the way people relate to one another. 

Our alumni

Megan McGrath is a Ph.D. candidate in the Writing Studies Department at the University of Minnesota—Twin Cities, where she teaches first-year writing and technical and professional writing. Her research examines how emerging technologies, such as wearables, influence agency, identity, and social norms. In the process, Megan's work also focuses on helping students cultivate digital literacies in ways that draw attention to the power structures enabling and constraining—and enabled and constrained by––technology use today.

Sarah Canon was an MS student in Scientific and Technical Communication at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. Her research interests include next generation education, learning technologies, and augmented realities. Her current research investigates the impact of augmented reality (AR) on writing/technical communication pedagogy. Sarah is currently a senior technical writer and information designer at F2 Group

WRC + LATIS

The Liberal Arts Technologies & Innovation Services (LATIS) is an IT unit housed within the College of Liberal Arts at the University of Minnesota providing liberal arts-specific expertise, facilities, and technology services to support the innovative work of the CLA community. 

LATIS supports the Wearables Research Collaborative by granting access to technologies such as Google Cardboard, RICOH Theta, and the ETC Lab, as well as other vital technology services.

Dept. of Writing Studies

Our collaboration with the Department of Writing Studies aims to combine theory and practice in writing, communication, rhetoric, and digital media. WRC researchers and students examine the social, legal, ethical, and political implications of writing and communication related to areas such as science, environment, technology, and workplace practices.